Fibreculture

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fibreculture reviews

The Fibreculture reviews section of the site aims to provide a space for list members to post reviews of the most current literature in fields of interest to the Fibreculture network. We are also happy to archive material posted by list members such as interviews and articles of interest.

Please contact Lisa Gye if you would like to add a review to this section.

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Current Reviews

Women, Art, and Technology
Women in New Media
Sources in Art and Technology
Edited by Judy Malloy
Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2003 (Leonardo Series)

Review by Belinda Barnet Open Review

Forthcoming Reviews

Metacreation: Art and Artificial Life
Mitchell Whitelaw
Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, March 2004
ISBN 0-262-23234-0

New Philosophy for New Media
Mark B.N. Hansen
Foreword by Tim Lenoir
Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, March 2004
ISBN 0-262-08321-3

Roy Ascott, Telematic Embrace: Visionary Theories of Art, Technology, and Consciousness
Edited and with an Essay by Edward A. Shanken
Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003
ISBN 0-520-21803-5

Stuff it: The Video Essay in the Digital Age
Edited by Ursula Biemann
for the Institute for Theory of Art and Design, Zurich, 2003
ISBN 3-211-20318-4

Writing on Air
Edited by David Rothenberg & Wandee J. Pryor
A Terra Nova Book
Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2003
ISBN 0-262-18230-0

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Interviews & Essays

Belinda Barnet and Doug Engelbart

From Belinda:
This interview has never been published, so I thought I'd send it to the list because it has historical value. Wanted to make a copy that's accessible to people. The man interviewed below is called Doug Engelbart - among other things, he invented the mouse, gave the world's first public demonstration of what became the WIMP interface (a design that went to Xerox and then on to Apple), created the first working hypertext system, and also pioneered video conferencing. His lab was the network information center for the early ARPANET.

Open Interview